Mar 9 2014

The dual income conundrum – Americans need to work two jobs to make up for stagnant wages and the sinister impact of a middle class being eaten away by inflation.

In the United States the dual income household is the status quo.  In the late 1960s dual income households were not common.  Today however two income households are the majority largely because many Americans require two incomes just to stay afloat.  This has been labeled as the “two income trap” and in many ways, it […]

Feb 28 2014

Household debt first increase in 4 years largely driven by massive increases in student debt. Auto loans showed increase volume in sub-prime loans.

In a recent post we discussed how personal income growth is having tough go at the current economy.  However, with incomes largely stuck in the quicksand of a mediocre economy for the working class, we see that the elixir of spending is back at the table again.  Debt spending is making up for the lack […]

Feb 25 2014

Personal income faces first year-over-year drop since recession ended: As incomes collapse, spending via consumer credit begins to increase.

There is little doubt that our economy runs on access to debt.  Not a tiny bit of debt.  But Himalayan mountains of debt.  The banking crisis was pitched to the public as one of liquidity but in reality, it was one of solvency.  The difference?  One is a temporary inability to repay debts while the […]

Feb 11 2014

The global debt reckoning – Total global debt at $230 trillion. Total world debt over 300 percent annual GDP. There is no escape from a reckoning with debt markets.

Total global debt crossed a troubling event horizon by going past the $200 trillion mark last year.  Given the latest figures we are likely well above a total global debt of $230 trillion based on a comprehensive study done by ING last year.  The banking sector rummages for every possible way of accessing debt.  Global […]

Feb 8 2014

The shackles of consumer credit in a low rate environment – Banks would rather leverage low rates from the Fed than lend money to cash strapped American households. 15 percent average rate on credit cards and typical savings account rate near 0 percent.

In a world where debt equals the ability to purchase large items, access to debt is king.  For this reason banks are the new modern day oligarchy since they have a nearly unlimited line of credit with the Federal Reserve.  The public during the credit bubble days had access to nearly unlimited debt via mortgages, […]

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