Jul 3 2012

The great deleveraging – US households see access to debt diminish. Housing affordability and reversion to the home price to family income ratio.

Households in the US continue to face a painfully slow process of austerity via debt deleveraging.  In a debt based system like the one we live in access to debt is viewed by many as access to money.  That is, your ability to finance a car, home, vacation, or even a college education is largely […]

Mar 12 2012

The old get wealthier and the young get poorer.

This recession has been unmercifully brutal on younger Americans.  Many are entering the most difficult employment market in generations with a flood of low wage jobs saddled with record levels of student debt.  Many have never even witnessed how it is to live in a bull stock market.    Of course this is assuming they had […]

Feb 23 2012

The compression of generations – 25 million adults live at home with parents because they’re unemployed or underemployed. The crushing cost of a college education today.

The thought of moving out on your own and making your individual way in the world is very much an American trait.  Certainly movies and television shows almost always assume every American has moved out on their own once adulthood is reached.  What this recession has taught us is never take anything for what is […]

Oct 31 2011

The desert mirage of easy housing profits – Phoenix Arizona home prices on track for four consecutive years of year-over-year home price declines. 55 percent fall from peak and nominal home prices back to 2000 levels. What happens when investors dominate the market?

The foreclosure epidemic in states like Arizona and Nevada is breathtaking and incredibly disheartening.  Prices have cratered much more quickly than the methodical rise up in the last decade.  Home prices in Phoenix now sit precariously where they did in 2000 without adjusting for inflation.  These desert communities largely built on a dream, fast construction, […]

Sep 19 2011

The banking gears of housing – Bank of America sells mortgage servicing rights on large loan pool to Fannie Mae. 400,000 loans shifted to Fannie Mae with $73 billion in unpaid principal.

Things just seem to get more perplexing with the housing market.  Back in August the Wall Street Journal discussed a deal between Fannie Mae and Bank of America.  The deal is odd even for the current banking system we have in place.  It was reported that Fannie Mae purchased the servicing rights to 400,000 loans […]

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