Jul 7 2015

You are being lied to about inflation. Latest CPI figures show nearly no inflation over the past year. Yet housing, tuition, and healthcare costs continue to soar.

Inflation.  Few people think about inflation but simply accept the reality that prices will go up.  However prices going up has a deeper economic reason than simply momentum.  Inflation is notorious at destroying your standard of living.  Our current financial system is now setup in a way to punish savers.  Most banks are offering near […]

Mar 15 2014

The big economies cannot avoid a soft default as they face their debt reckoning: U.S. and other central banks battle it out for artificially low interest rates on unsupportable levels of debt.

Would you lend money to someone that you knew would never pay you back?  The answer is, probably not unless you are okay with burning through hard earned cash.  The global central banks unfortunately have entered into terminal velocity when it comes to debt support.  The U.S. carries a stunning $17.51 trillion in total public […]

Sep 29 2011

The punishment of the American saver – JP Morgan Chase CEO makes 843 times the median household income and pays his Chase customers 0.01 percent on their savings.

The current financial system is designed to punish old school savers.  By definition in our debt based economy those who save are actually taking fuel out of the consumption based economy.  Spendthrifts are the high octane that keeps things spinning even if it comes with a high debt price tag.  You see this occurring in […]

May 25 2010

Why buying a home today makes little financial sense. 3 reasons why taking on a mortgage in today’s market is deep in speculation. Are homes still over valued? Tax benefit not as big as you would expect.

It is hard for many to believe that home prices in many of our largest cities are still overvalued.  Part of this distortion has to come from living in a decade long housing bubble that has adjusted the perception of value and price.  But in many areas home prices are still much too high relative […]

Mar 17 2010

The Anti-Savings Model – Offer 0.1% APY on Savings Accounts and Charge 15% on Credit Cards. A System Designed to Punish Savers and Encourage Extravagant Spending via Usury.

U.S. Banks have a solid incentive, dipped in gold, to keep people in a perpetual state of paying rent on debt while not saving a shiny penny.  In fact, their ideal state of financial equilibrium for Americans would be one in which people spent every single penny from their earnings reaching the end of the […]

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