Nov 17 2014

The mega inflation in college tuition: Since 1985 college tuition costs have soared by 538 percent. No surprise that total student debt is now over $1.22 trillion.

There was a time when college tuition was reasonably priced in the United States. In fact, college was downright cheap. These were the days when people worked a few hours a week at minimum wage jobs and were able to pay off their tuition on a semester basis. Too bad most of the new jobs […]

Apr 7 2014

Why you should fear inflation: The CPI understates the true nature of inflation. BLS only allocates less than 2 percent to tuition in CPI. Missing big on the biggest expense in housing.

Some people believe that inflation is simply a part of the normal economy like seeing the sunrise every day.  Over time prices will rise on everything, or so the argument goes.  I’m not sure if most dig into the question any deeper and question the nature of prices rising.  If we look at inflation over […]

Jun 17 2012

The broken tassel of American higher education – College debt defaults bring up questions about repayment structure. Is college even worth the current costs?

As hundreds of thousands of young American enter the employment market with newly minted degrees, the clock begins to tick on those heavy student loans.  The majority of student loans do not enter repayment until six months after graduation.  Yet we are facing tectonic shifts in higher education.  The cost of going to college, seemingly […]

Jan 5 2012

Is college worth the money and debt? The cost of college has increased by 11x since 1980 while inflation overall has increased by 3x. Diluting education with for-profits. and saddling millions with debt.

Is a college degree worth it?  Since the debt bubble burst spectacularly in 2007 many more prospective students are questioning the worth of a college degree.  For so many decades it was simply taken at face value that getting a college degree, any college degree would be worth it.  Slowly this perception has morphed when […]

Jul 1 2011

College education becomes a predator’s lounge for Wall Street and the government – Since 2000 the real cost of college is up by 23 percent yet the real earnings of college graduates is down by 11 percent.

The cost of going to college seems to defy the rules of fundamental economics and basic gravity.  Over the last decade the real earnings of college graduates has fallen yet the cost of a four year education continues to go up almost oblivious to this fact.  These kinds of dislocations in markets typically signify bubbles […]

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