Oct 17 2011

The chastisement of the American saver – Federal Reserve offers a higher interest rate to banking reserves than too big to fail banks offer American savers.

Americans are facing a banking system that is largely designed to go against their best economic interest.  Even a decade ago people were able to find a savings account or a certificate of deposit that would keep up with the rate of inflation.  Today, most typical savings accounts at too big to fail banks offer […]

Mar 31 2011

Federal Reserve punishes savers by subsidizing big banking bailouts – Two largest U.S. banks offer a paltry 0.05 annual percentage rate while increasing service fee charges and upping loan interest rates. S&P 500 not cheap.

The challenge most Americans are facing is first, trying to save money.  If that hurdle is accomplished the next tougher question becomes where the money should be placed.  The Federal Reserve by default with a negative interest rate policy has punished savers at the expense of massive debtors.  The Fed for many decades since the […]

Jan 31 2011

Federal Reserve punishing savers in low interest rate environment – Since the 1960s 5-year Treasury Bills average 6.5 percent. Today a high yield money market account will get you 1 percent.

Saving money is usually pushed to the background in a debt induced economy built around spending.  Marketing firms are designed with the intention of parting you from your hard earned dollar.  The housing bubble was a manifestation of a system permeated by easy access to debt and promises to repay current purchases with future dollars.  […]

Aug 17 2010

As more Americans save the typical too big to fail banking savings account is paying close to 0 percent in interest. At the same time the average credit card interest rate is over 14 percent.

The one silver lining of this crisis if there is one to be had is that many more Americans are actually saving more money.  However the problem that many now face is historically low interest rates through bank savings accounts.  Average Americans have few places to go receive a decent return (5% or lower) without […]

Jun 5 2010

FDIC massive problems ahead with smaller bank failures. 105 banks hold 77 percent of all banking assets. $10 trillion held in too big to fail while 775 banks appear on the FDIC problem list.

The FDIC went ahead and closed another handful of banks this Friday.  It really is a rare day to see 400,000+ jobs added and the market retreat so significantly.  A large part of the gains came from temporary Census hiring which peaked last month.  If the economy were really recovering banks wouldn’t be failing on […]

Page 5 of 10« First...34567...10...Last »

My Budget 360

Enter your email address to receive updates from My Budget 360:

100% Private & Spam Free.

 


Subscribe in a reader

 

Popular – All Time


  • 1. How much does the Average American Make? Breaking Down the U.S. Household Income Numbers.
  • 2. Top 1 Percent Control 42 Percent of Financial Wealth in the U.S. – How Average Americans are Lured into Debt Servitude by Promises of Mega Wealth.
  • 3. Is college worth the money and debt? The cost of college has increased by 11x since 1980 while inflation overall has increased by 3x. Diluting education with for-profits. and saddling millions with debt.
  • 4. The Perfect $46,000 Budget: Learning to Live in California for Under $50,000.
  • 5. Family Budget: How to go Broke on $100,000 a year. Why the Middle Class has a hard time Living in Expensive Urban Areas.
  • 6. Lining up at Midnight at Wal-Mart to buy Food is part of the new Recovery. Banks offering Mattress Interest Rates. The Invisible Recovery Outside of Wall Street.
  • 7. You Cannot Afford a $350,000 Home with a $75,000 Household Income!
  • 8. Crisis of generations – younger Americans moving back home in large numbers. Student loan default rates surging largely due to for-profit college expansion.
  • 9. The next massive debt bubble to crush the economy – 10 charts examining the upcoming implosion of the student loan market. $1 trillion in student loans and defaults sharply increasing.
  • 10. Welcome to the new model of retirement. No retirement. In 1983 over 60 percent of American workers had some kind of defined-benefit plan. Today less than 20 percent have access to a plan and the majority of retired Americans largely rely on Social Security as their de facto retirement plan.
  • Categories