Sep 24 2014

The New Normal for the American Dream – 3 Cornerstones: Low wage jobs, high levels of college debt, and a retirement that consists of working until you pass away.

There seems to be a growing acceptance that the American Dream is hardly as accessible as it once was. Low wage jobs, higher education tuition pushing many into untenable levels of debt, and a new vision of retirement all seem to connect into one new theme. The new theme revolves on a much more challenging […]

Jul 29 2014

Collection nation: One out of three consumers have debts in collection over the past year. A total of 77 million Americans are having problems managing their debt. 22 million consumers have zero credit.

A recent report by the Urban Institute and Encore Capital Group’s Consumer Credit Research Institute has found some rather startling news about consumer debt in the United States. Over one third of consumers had some sort of debt in collection over the past year. Of course this coincides with the struggling employment growth that many […]

Jul 27 2014

Driving our way into poverty: Subprime auto debt continues to expand while domestic auto production remains weak.

Americans love their cars. Urban sprawl with poorly designed city centers has made driving a near necessity for most people. During the credit crisis, one of the problems that occurred was that too many loans were being made to people that had no ability of paying their debt back. We see this trend in full […]

Jul 25 2014

When does college become too expensive? Tuition growth continues to outpace income growth and the student debt bubble continues to expand with the vast majority of debt going to the young.

When does college become too expensive? Will there be a bell going off like during a boxing match? What is the price tag that makes getting an education too expensive? It is obvious in the current economy that many prospective students cannot afford a college education without going into joint breaking levels of debt. Many […]

Jun 15 2014

Crony capitalism and the cult of borrowing: As the banking sector is fully bailed out, Americans push aside history and begin to leverage into debt to compensate for stagnant wages.

Banking should operate as a utility by providing businesses and consumers a source of funds for projects that will add real growth in the real economy. Unfortunately, the current banking system favors speculation and banking for the sake of banking. It also favors creating a non-working class that merely lives off of speculation and their […]

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