Top 10 Best and Worst Years for the Dow Jones Industrial Average Listed by President.

It is interesting to actually look at the Dow Jones Industrial Average and look at the 10 best and 10 worst performing years and look at who was President at the time.  Just because you have the best performing year or the worst, this doesn’t necessarily mean it is all the person in office fault.  You need to remember that during these times there was the Great Depression, World Wars, and other market panics.  Again, market volatility is not a sign of a healthy market and in fact may show fundamental weakness.Take the list below for what it is worth.  If anything, it will show you that both parties have seen bright and dark days.The Dow’s 10 Best Years

The Dow’s Best Years

Rank

Year

Close

% Change

President

woodrowwilson.jpg1

1915

99.15

81.66

Woodrow Wilson (Dem)

franklinroosevelt.jpg2

1933

99.90

66.69

Franklin D. Roosevelt (Dem)

calvincoolidge.jpg3

1928

300.00

48.22

Calvin Coolidge (Rep)

theodoreroosevelt.jpg4

1908

86.15

46.64

Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)

dwighteisenhower.jpg5

1954

404.39

43.96

Dwight D. Eisenhower (Rep)

theodoreroosevelt.jpg6

1904

69.61

41.74

Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)

franklinroosevelt.jpg7

1935

144.13

38.53

Franklin D. Roosevelt (Dem)

geraldford.jpg8

1975

852.41

38.32

Gerald R. Ford (Rep)

theodoreroosevelt.jpg9

1905

96.20

38.20

Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)

dwighteisenhower.jpg10

1958

583.65

33.96

Dwight D. Eisenhower (Rep)

The Dow’s 10 Worst Years:

The Dow’s Worst Years

Rank

Year

Close

% Change

President

herberthoover.jpg1

1931

77.90

-52.67 Herbert Hoover (Rep)

theodoreroosevelt.jpg2

1907

58.75

-37.73 Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)

herberthoover.jpg3

1930

164.58

-33.77 Herbert Hoover (Rep)

woodrowwilson.jpg4

1920

71.95

-32.90 Woodrow Wilson (Dem)

franklinroosevelt.jpg5

1937

120.85

-32.82 Franklin D. Roosevelt (Dem)

richardnixon.jpg6

1974

616.24

-27.57 Richard M. Nixon (Rep)

theodoreroosevelt.jpg7

1903

49.11

-23.61 Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)

herberthoover.jpg8

1932

59.93

-23.07 Herbert Hoover (Rep)

woodrowwilson.jpg9

1917

74.38

-21.71 Woodrow Wilson (Dem)

lyndonjohnson.jpg10

1966

785.69

-18.94 Lyndon B. Johnson (Dem)

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1 Comments on this post

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  1. Mark Vice said:

    Great post!

    June 12th, 2010 at 7:06 am

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